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Islamic theology says that all of God's messengers preached the message of Islam—submission to the will of God.The Quran mentions the names of numerous figures considered prophets in Islam, including Adam, Noah, Abraham, Moses and Jesus, among others.

In Islam, the "normative" example of Muhammad's life is called the Sunnah (literally "trodden path").The trials and tribulations preceding and during the Qiyāmah are described in the Quran and the hadith, and also in the commentaries of scholars.The Quran emphasizes bodily resurrection, a break from the pre-Islamic Arabian understanding of death.Religious concepts and practices include the Five Pillars of Islam, which are obligatory acts of worship, and following Islamic law, which touches on virtually every aspect of life and society, from banking and welfare to women and the environment.and by the 8th century the Umayyad Islamic caliphate extended from Iberia in the west to the Indus River in the east.The primary scriptures of Islam are the Quran, viewed by Muslims as the verbatim word of God, and the teachings and normative example (called the sunnah, composed of accounts called hadith) of Muhammad ( 570–8 June 632 CE).

Muslims believe that Islam is the complete and universal version of a primordial faith that was revealed many times before through prophets including Adam, Abraham, Moses and Jesus.

Some authors, however, continue to use the term Muhammadanism as a technical term for the religious system as opposed to the theological concept of Islam that exists within that system.

Muslims repudiate polytheism and idolatry, called Shirk, and reject the Christian doctrine of the Trinity and divinity of Jesus.

In Islam, God is beyond all comprehension and Muslims are not expected to visualize God.) means "messenger", like its counterparts in Hebrew (malʾákh) and Greek (angelos).

Angels do not possess any bodily desires are not subject to temptations nor do they eat, drink or procreate.

The Islamic Golden Age refers to the period traditionally dated from the 8th century to the 13th century, during the Abbasid Caliphate, when much of the historically Islamic world was experiencing a scientific, economic and cultural flourishing.